'Newport First Stop' - 100 Years of News Stories
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Newport Past
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1841

Merlin. 2nd January, 1841
Clock for St. Paul's Church

This splendid piece of mechanism is now finished, and may be seen at the shop of the maker, Mr. William Latch, of this town. It would have been fixed in place ere this, but the bell will not be completed until next month, when it will be placed on the tower of St. Paul's. We can then "take note of time," besides "by its loss."


Merlin. 23rd January, 1841
Burial of One of the Rifle Brigade

Last Monday forenoon, the imposing ceremonies attendant upon the funeral of a soldier, were performed over the remains of William Jones, private of the Second Battalion of Rifles, now quartered in this town, aged 24 years. The poor fellow had been lingering two years. The full band of the Brigade was in attendance, and seldom have we heard the "Dead March in Saul" performed with more touching excellence than on this mournful occasion. The Rev. Isaacson officiated and read the beautiful burial service with more than usual sympathy. At the last halting-place of the deceased, twelve of his comrades fired a farewell volley over his remains, and after the sad offices of committing "dust to dust" had been performed, the procession, headed by the Commander of the Company, Captain Napier, marched away with slow and stately tread, from the grave of their departed brother.


Merlin. 6th February, 1841
Fearful Des titution

One of the poor fellows who was recently discharged from the Dock Works, and who has since been unable to obtain employment, is now suffering the most terrible destitution at Pillgwenlly, having a wife and four helpless children almost starving, who have subsisted entirely on boiled turnips and a four penny loaf during the last seven days, and numerous other families are in the same condition. The unfortunate husband went yesterday in quest of employment, but from the severity of the weather, there can be little hope of speedy relief being obtained from his endeavours for his destitute and starving family.


Merlin. 20th March, 1841
Accident

On Wednesday evening, as Mr. Harry Fry accompanied by Mrs. Fry were returning from Machen to Newport in a four-wheeled chaise, about a mile and a half from the house of Mr. Woodruffe (where Mr. and Mrs. Fry had been to dinner), the horse which drew the chaise began to plunge and kick violently, and finally upset the chaise precipitating Mr. and Mrs. Fry into the road. Mrs. Fry happily escaped unhurt, but Mr. Fry suffered a dislocation of the shoulder-joint. Assistance having quickly arrived, he was brought back to the residence of Mr. Woodruffe, where he was attended by Mr. W.W. Morgan and he returned to Newport the same night in a fly.


Merlin. 1st May, 1841
The Captain and his Pea-blower

A charge appeared on the police sheet against Captain Capell of the Rifle Brigade, now stationed in Newport, by Mr. E. Buckingham for having on Wednesday night fired several bullets from the opposite side of the street, through a "pea-blower," about four feet long, against the windows of the West of England Bank, by which the windows were broken. It was intimated to the Magistrates that the matter had been settled by the complainant and defendant out of court, upon which P.C. Huxtable was called, who said he was on the beat near the Parrot on the previous night, and saw the Captain blow several bullets through a long wooden tube in the shape of a walking stick, which was now produced, against the Bank windows, by which they were broken. Being taken to the Station House, bail was taken for his appearance this morning; when, as neither of the parties came forward, no further proceedings were taken, Superintendent Hopkins was desired to detain the miniature piece of artillery till Captain Capell should feel inclined to apply for its restoration.


Merlin. 29th May, 1841
Lady-Like Pursuits

The first prisoners placed at the bar this morning were Mary Joseph and Charlotte Jones, two Amazonian figures of the usual slovenly appearance of Friar's Fields, denizens who stood charged with being caught in the act of fighting, creating a mob, and alarming the peaceful residents at the canal side, each staggering under her opponent's blows, and the head overloaded with alcohol. - P.C. Bath detailed the proceedings that took place at the fight, and rendered a faithful portraiture of the melancholy exhibition of women under the influence of gin; Mr. Hopkins gave evidence with respect to the prisoners' mode of living. - Mary Joseph two months, and Charlotte Jones one month in the House of Correction.


Merlin. 4th September, 1841
Departure of the Rifle Brigade

This distinguished corps, which has been quartered here for the last twelve months, took its departure in three or four divisions, which proceeded by packet from this port for Bristol in the early part of the week, and has been replaced by the 11th Regiment of Infantry.


Merlin. 13th November, 1841
Prolific Potato

Mr. Duckham, of the Noah's Ark, Skinner Street, planted a single potato at the usual time last season, and the produce was so great he has requested us to give it publicity. The number of potatoes attached to the root, exclusive of very small ones was 73; the weight of which was 52 lbs. Mr. Duckham has sent one to our office of extraordinary dimensions.


Merlin. 13th November, 1841
Gunpowder Plot

Evan Davies, alias Evan the Milkman, with a broken beak and villainous countenance; William Walford one of the "crack files" of Friar's Fields; Jeremiah Driscoll not at all the better for his present notorious company; and one Edward Lewis; were respectively charged with pulling about tar barrels on fire, and aiding and abetting in riotously disturbing the public peace on the night of the 5th of November last, in commemoration of the Gunpowder Plot, contrary to the public notice issued by the magistrates of the borough on the previous day. - There was no evidence offered against Lewis and he was accordingly discharged with a suitable reproof, and Driscoll could not deny that he had been most actively engaged in hauling through the crowded streets a tar barrel in flames; he was fined ten shillings and costs or one months imprisonment with hard labour. His master Mr. Davies, landlord of the King William paid the fine and he was discharged.

Evan the milkman and Walford were proved to be about the foremost in the fiery sports of the evening and while their examination was proceeding, Mr. Noah Bowen, blacksmith, stepped forward to charge them both with stealing a barrel containing about 26 gallons of coal-tar, his property, and called a young lad in his employ to substantiate the accusation. Morgan proved that he saw Walford go towards the barrel with a shovelful of fire with which he lighted the tar; and afterwards he saw Evan Davies engaged in hauling the flaming barrel away assisted by Walford. A fellow known as "Jack the Mouse," a brother to Evan the milkman, was said by witness to have stolen a pot of tar, containing about two gallons from Mr. Bowen 's premises and poured it into the barrel. - His Worship severely censured the conduct of the prisoners, saying it was clearly made out that they were actively engaged in the riot of the evening, and he sentenced them to each pay a fine of forty shillings or be imprisoned in the House of Correction with hard labour for the space of three months.

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'Newport First Stop' - 100 Years of News Stories
[ Contents ] [ Acknowledgements ] [ Preface ] [ Postscript ] [ Chronology ]
[ 1800 - 29 ] [ 1830 - 39 ] [ 1840 - 49 ] [ 1850 - 59 ] [ 1860 - 69 ] [ 1870 - 79 ] [ 1880 - 89 ] [ 1890 - 99 ]
[ 1840 ] [ 1841 ] [ 1842 ] [ 1843 ] [ 1844 ] [ 1845 ] [ 1846 ] [ 1847 ] [ 1848 ] [ 1849 ]

Newport Past
[ Picture Gallery ] [Home Page ]